Series, Rhythm of life

Confronting the capacity for polarisation. The courage for transformation in middle school

By Claus-Peter Röh, July 2021

When young people in middle school break free from the “gold background” of childhood and undergo strong transformations in their soul, they also challenge their teachers to transform themselves. The unfolding of the personal feeling life in the transition to adolescence also includes the increasing ability to polarise. [more]

Series, Teamwork

The main lesson as a foundation for living education

By Tomáš Zdražil, June 2021

Between five and six million people regularly watch the quiz show “Who wants to be millionaire” on the German broadcaster RTL. The selective knowledge pulled from a wide variety of subject areas is completely incoherent and isolated, and the value and importance of this knowledge is questionable and arbitrary. Cooking appears alongside geography, football alongside literature, Hollywood alongside opera. Actual knowledge becomes blended with hunches and guesswork in the multiple-choice form that the questions take. The questions on meaningless trivia are fuelled by both a desire to win and to create thrilling entertainment. Since 1998, the show has been running in more than 100 countries around the world. [more]

Series, Sources of health

Calm in the maelstrom

By Susanne Speckenbach, May 2021

Many feet scuffling, many hands rustling, many mouths chattering – there is always something going on in a class. So how can the children learn anything at all? We need quiet and activity. The class teacher, with their close connection to the pupils, has a number of things they can do. [more]

Series, Birth and Spirit

“Parent work” – from the class teacher’s perspective

By Semjon Schmidt-Rüdt, March 2021

What actually is “parent work”? How does it become apparent and what role does the teacher play in it? An overview of this essential task is given by a class teacher of 20 years’ standing. [more]

Series, Transhumanism

Two sisters and a legacy. Waldorf education in New Zealand

By Nana Göbel, May 2020

Anthroposophy came to New Zealand as early as the second decade of the twentieth century through Emma Richmond. Her daughter, the teacher Rachel Crompton-Smith, together with her husband Bernard Crompton-Smith opened the small St George School in Havelock North in 1917 at which girls and boys were taught together, something extraordinary at that time. This impulse was taken up by Ethel Edwina Burbury and Ruth Nelson who founded the anthroposophical Taruna centre and a short time later the first Waldorf school in Hastings. [more]

Series, From image to concept

A Nordic trio. Walter Liebendörfer, Frans Carlgren and Bengt Ulin

By Nana Göbel, April 2020

In the early 1950s, a number of teachers joined the Kristofferskolan in Stockholm, the first and at that time only Waldorf school in Sweden, and shaped this school for decades. They stood out through their pioneering spirit, humorous earnestness and an inwardly free attitude towards anthroposophy.  [more]

Series

Patron saint of children

By Nana Göbel, March 2020

Klara Hattermann and the beginnings of the Waldorf kindergarten movement. [more]

Series

Woman power in Great Britain

By Nana Göbel, February 2020

Rudolf Steiner supported the development of Waldorf education in England with lively interest. He gave important lecture cycles on education there between 1923 and 1924, visited the first school and advised the founding college of teachers. [more]

Series

With eurythmy and Chinese in Colombia

By Nana Göbel, January 2020

Walter Boris Liebenthal (1933–2011) left a rich literary and artistic legacy for the Chinese Waldorf school movement.  [more]

Series

Mary-Joan Fajardo. Pioneer of Waldorf education in the Philippines

By Nana Göbel, December 2019

Mary-Joan Fajardo was one of the well-educated, culturally interested and independent women in the Philippines. In the 1980s, she worked as a lecturer of the Philippine Educational Theatre Association in Manila and, in the face of the worrying signs in Philippine politics in the 1970s and 1980s, asked herself what was wrong with the world and how better conditions could be created. Her answer was: through education. [more]

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