American schoolchildren are becoming less creative

December 2012

Kyung Hee Kim, a professor of education at the College of William and Mary, recently detected a continuous decline in creativity among American schoolchildren over the last two or three decades.

The data indicate that “children have become less emotionally expressive, less energetic, less talkative and verbally expressive, less humorous, less imaginative, less unconventional, less lively and passionate, less perceptive, less apt to connect seemingly irrelevant things, less synthesizing, and less likely to see things from a different angle.” 

According to Kim’s research, all aspects of creativity have declined, but the biggest decline is in the measure called Creative Elaboration, which assesses the ability to take a particular idea and expand on it in an interesting and novel way.

Peter Gray, a research professor of psychology at Boston College, suggests, that the decline is a consequence of our educational system. “For several decades we as a society have been suppressing children’s freedom to ever-greater extents, and now we find that their creativity is declining”, he writes in “The Creativity Post”, a website dedicated to creativity.

Gray continues: “Creativity is nurtured by freedom and stifled by the continuous monitoring, evaluation, adult-direction, and pressure to conform that restrict children’s lives today.  In the real world few questions have one right answer, few problems have one right solution; that’s why creativity is crucial to success in the real world.  But more and more we are subjecting children to an educational system that assumes one right answer to every question and one correct solution to every problem, a system that punishes children (and their teachers too) for daring to try different routes.  We are also increasingly depriving children of free time outside of school to play, explore, be bored, overcome boredom, fail, overcome failure—that is, to do all that they must do in order to develop their full creative potential.”

Read the full article

All news in this category

Why write? Penmanship for the 21st Century

What is the future of writing in the digital age, and why does it matter? In this surprising talk, Master Penman Jake Weidmann explores the... [more]

Polyhedric educational experiences

The main focus of this video is the recent development of the upper classes of the Scuola Novalis. The Libera Scuola Steiner-Waldorf “Novalis” is... [more]

Having 28 daughters. Waldorf Education in India

An interview with Manorama Kamineni, Sloka Waldorf School Hyderabad. [more]

Googlification in the Classroom – The High-Tech Invasion of our Schools

The posters on the classroom wall say, ‘Dream!’ ‘Laugh!’ It seems ironic that these posters remind us of a childhood which is long gone. Some third... [more]

1100 Schools and The Challenges of Teacher Education

Currently, there are 1100 Steiner Waldorf Schools worldwide. One of the challenges to do with this development is the education or professional... [more]

Can physicians benefit from arts?

According to a new study, medical students with a more diverse background, which includes artistic and visual skills may potentially hold an edge... [more]

Kings Langley Rudolf Steiner School on reforming path to avoid closure

A long-established Rudolf Steiner School in the United Kingdom is fighting to stay open following a decision by the Department for Education (DfE) in... [more]

First Waldorf School in Istanbul opened

In Turkey, the Waldorf School and Kindergarten movement is still in its infancy.  [more]

State Recognition for the Yechiel Waldorf School in Israel

About ten years ago, a very dedicated couple founded and provided essential financial support for a Waldorf School In the small village of Tal... [more]

License renewed for Waldorf School Tiflis

Every six years, free schools in Georgia need to have their license renewed in order to continue operating. With the ever-changing political... [more]

Displaying results 11 to 20 out of 124

< Previous

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

Page 4

Page 5

Page 6

Page 7

Next >

Follow