The Powerful Force of Curiosity

October 2016

Curiosity killed the cat. Eve was curious about the forbidden fruit. Pandora was curious about what was in that box.

Parables and proverbs of the past often warn against the dangers of seeking. Today, this notion is outdated. We claim to no longer accept the idea that we’re all better off minding our own business and accepting given answers. Seeking new questions is valued… or is it? It’s one thing to claim to be in support of curiosity and quite another to allow it to thrive in any given environment.

In a 2015 PwC survey of more than one thousand CEOs, many cited “curiosity” as a critical leadership trait. Yet companies are often accused of discouraging curiosity because it can lead to questions that undermine authority, slow productivity, and put traditional means of working under scrutiny. And while educators have long been supporters of curiosity, they have also fallen prey to similar criticism, both historically and in modern education.

Albert Einstein was a severe critic of education in his time, saying: “It is nothing short of a miracle that modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry.” Today, education doesn’t fare much better at the hand of critics — often classified as places where curiosity is not valued or even where it comes “to die.”

Read more

 

All news in this category

Body, soul and spirit

Ulrich Weger (University Witten/Hedecke) and Johannes Wagemann (Alanus Hochschule Alfter) have published an article in the renowned professional... [more]

A Second Enlightenment in the Making?

In the Huffington Post, popular scientist, organisational developer and anthroposophically motivated thinker Otto Scharmer speaks about his recent... [more]

Domestic report: Germany

All in all, Waldorf schools in Germany have a total of about 83’000 pupils and employ 9000 teachers. [more]

TTIP-Update: Success in the Plenary in Strasbourg

Given the numerous protests against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), it is not surprising that the public debate has been... [more]

Phases of Teenage Development and Waldorf High School Curriculum

In broad strokes, each of the four years in the Waldorf high school curriculum embodies an underlying theme and method that helps guide students not... [more]

Waldorf and Montessori: How do they compare?

The Waldorf and Montessori movements are both holistic, child centered approaches to learning. Both movements began in similar times, in similar... [more]

Early Academic Training Produces Long-Term Harm

Research reveals negative effects of academic preschools and kindergartens.  [more]

A Comparison of Waldorf and Mainstream Education

When parents are researching private schools, the myriad of options and different educational philosophies can sometimes be overwhelming. Many... [more]

Technology and Child Development

Technology's impact on the 21st century family is fracturing its very foundation, and causing a disintegration of core values that long ago were the... [more]

Epidemic Short-sightedness: A result of shortened outdoor-time?

East Asia has been gripped by an unprecedented rise in myopia, also known as short-sightedness. Sixty years ago, 10–20% of the Chinese population was... [more]

Displaying results 61 to 70 out of 130

< Previous

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

Page 4

Page 5

Page 6

Page 7

Next >

Follow